Moles

Description

Moles are a common type of skin growth. They often appear as small, dark brown spots and are caused by clusters of pigmented cells. Moles generally appear during childhood and adolescence. Most people have 10 to 40 moles, some of which may change in appearance or fade away over time. The optimal way to distinguish between these other growths is by consultation with a dermatologist, which may include a skin biopsy. The presence of a giant congenital mole greater than approximately 8-10 inches in size also may confer an increased risk of melanoma. Moles may be flat or raised; Sun exposure in childhood causes an increase in the number of moles. Most moles appear by age 30 are common small flesh-colored, tan, brown or black spots on the skin.

Irregular moles can occur anywhere on the body but are most commonly located on sun-exposed skin, especially on the upper back and shoulders where people frequently get their most severe sunburns. Ears are a particularly common site of atypical moles because of the difficulty in applying sunscreen and frequent sun exposure. Women have increased risks of atypical moles, particularly on the lower leg and calf. Moles are growths on the skin that are usually brown or black. Moles can appear anywhere on the skin, alone or in groups. A melanocytic is composed of masses of melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells of the skin. However, there are a variety of other skin lesions that are also mole-like.

Types of Moles

There are three basic types or groups of moles: regular and symmetrical, irregular, and cancerous. Atypical mole is another term for an irregular mole. Regular moles are typically benign and harmless. Regular moles are usually symmetrical, have regular borders, uniform color and are about the size of a pencil eraser or smaller. Normal moles are generally a uniform color such as tan, brown or black with a distinct border separating the mole from your surrounding skin. They’re oval or round and usually smaller than 1/4 inch (about 6 millimeters) in diameter  the size of a pencil eraser.

Symptoms for Moles

The typical mole is a brown spot. But moles come in different colors, shapes and sizes:

  • Color and texture. Moles can be brown, tan, black, red, blue or pink. They can be smooth, wrinkled, flat or raised. They may have hair growing from them.
  • Shape. Most moles are oval or round.
  • Size. Moles are usually less than 1/4 inch (about 6 millimeters) in diameter the size of a pencil eraser. Rarely, moles present at birth (congenital nevi) can be much bigger, covering wide areas of the face, torso or a limb.

Causes for moles

Moles are caused when cells in the skin (melanocytes) grow in clusters or clumps. Melanocytes are distributed throughout your skin and produce melanin, the natural pigment that gives your skin its color. The genes we inherit from our parents, along with our amount of sun exposure (especially during childhood) are major factors in determining mole numbers. some cells develop DNA damage, new cells may begin to grow out of control and can eventually form a mass of cancerous cells. Just what damages DNA in skin cells and how this leads to melanoma isn’t clear. It’s likely that a combination of factors, including environmental and genetic factors, causes melanoma.

They frequently appear on people with light complexions. Many people with blond or red hair and green or blue eyes are more prone to these types of skin spots. Sun avoidance and sun protection including the regular use of sunscreen may help to suppress the appearance of some types of moles and freckles. Moles are caused when cells in the skin (melanocytes) grow in clusters or clumps. Melanocytes are distributed throughout your skin and produce melanin, the natural pigment that gives your skin its color.

Diagnosis

doctor can identify moles by looking at your skin. You may choose to make a skin examination a regular part of your preventive medical care. Talk to your doctor about a schedule that’s appropriate for you. During a skin exam, your doctor inspects your skin from head to toe.

  • Physical exam. Your doctor will ask questions about your health history and examine your skin to look for signs that may indicate melanoma.
  • Removing a sample of tissue for testing (biopsy). To determine whether a suspicious skin lesion is melanoma, your doctor may recommend removing a sample of skin for testing. The sample is sent to a lab for examination.

Treatment

Most moles don’t need treatment.

  • Mole removal

If your mole is cancerous, your doctor will do a surgical procedure to remove it. If you have a mole that causes irritation when you shave, you may want to have it removed.

  • Cosmetic care

If you’re self-conscious about a mole, you could try makeup to help conceal it. If you have a hair growing from a mole, you might try clipping it close to the skin’s surface or plucking it.

  • Targeted therapy

Targeted drug treatments focus on specific weaknesses present within cancer cells. By targeting these weaknesses, targeted drug treatments can cause cancer cells to die. Cells from your melanoma may be tested to see if targeted therapy is likely to be effective against your cancer.
For melanoma, targeted therapy might be recommended if the cancer has spread to your lymph nodes or to other areas of your body.

  • Radiation therapy

This treatment uses high-powered energy beams, such as X-rays and protons, to kill cancer cells. Radiation therapy may be directed to the lymph nodes if the melanoma has spread there. Radiation therapy can also be used to treat melanomas that can’t be removed completely with surgery.

This skin moles treatment uses intense bursts of light radiation to break down the mole cells in the skin. This method usually takes two or three treatments to eradicate the mole.

Prevention

After a mole-removal treatment, you can still go out and be exposed to the sun. However, you are advised to wear proper sun protection ( hats, protective clothing, sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher) to prevent moles from forming in the future and removed moles from returning. Monthly skin checks are also recommended for the identification of any irregular moles or changes in existing moles.

Hope this Symptoms and cure article will be helpful to all. Do not forget to share your valuable suggestions if any.