Food for Thyroid

An Overview

Thyroid hormones help control growth, cell repair and metabolism. As a result, people with hypothyroidism may experience tiredness, hair loss, weight gain, feeling cold, and feeling down, among many other symptoms. Maybe it’s for your weight. Maybe it’s for your heart. Maybe it’s for your brain. But have you ever thought about the best foods for thyroid patients? Yes, just like all of those other health-based goals, your tiny, monarch-shaped gland requires culinary attention because it’s one of the most important parts of your body.

Your thyroid needs iodine to work properly and produce enough TH for your body’s needs. Don’t get enough iodine, and you run the risk of hypothyroidism or a goiter (a thyroid gland that becomes enlarged to make up for the shortage of thyroid hormone). Most Americans have no problem getting enough iodine, since table salt is iodized—but if you’re on a low-sodium diet (as an increasing number of Americans are for their heart health) or follow a vegan diet (more on that later), then you may need to up your intake from other sources. Foods alone won’t cure hypothyroidism. However, a combination of the right nutrients and medication can help restore thyroid function and minimize your symptoms. This article outlines the best diet for hypothyroidism, including which foods to eat and which to avoid — all based on research.

Best food for Thyroid

1. Almonds:

Most nuts have some amount of selenium, which is a thyroid-healthy nutrient. But almonds also happen to have a high amount of magnesium, which, according to a study in Metabolism Journal, can keep your thyroid working smooth as butter.

2. Yogurt:

Short of eating a few kelp salads, you probably don’t have to worry about getting too much iodine from any other foods. In particular, dairy products are full of this nutrient (and in more manageable amounts), according to a 2012 research in the journal Nutrition Reviews. Part of the reason is because livestock are given iodine supplements and the milking process involves iodine-based cleaners.

3. Spinach:

All leafy greens are good for you, but spinach might be one of the best greens for the thyroid. According to a 2013 study in the International Journal of Trichology, there’s a direct link between zinc deficiency and hypothyroidism.

4. Brazil nuts:

Brazil nuts are packed with another nutrient that helps regulate thyroid hormones: selenium. In one 2003 study by researchers in France, women who consumed higher amounts of selenium were less likely to develop goiters and thyroid tissue damage than those who didn’t. Plus, it may also help stave off long-term thyroid damage in people with thyroid-related problems like Hashimoto’s and Graves’ disease, according to a 2013 review in the journal Clinical Endocrinology.

5. Turmeric:

This orange spice adds an instant wallop of flavor to your cooking, but, as it turns out, it’s also a powerhouse for helping keep your thyroid in tip-top shape. Turmeric contains a chemical compound called curcumin.

6. Navy beans:

foods high in iodine can help keep your thyroid’s hormone levels balanced. You can find iodine in most beans, but navy beans are your best source: In every cup, navy beans contain about 60 micrograms of iodine.

7. Chicken and beef:

Zinc is another key nutrient for your thyroid—your body needs it to churn out TH. Take in too little zinc, and it can lead to hypothyroidism. But get this: If you develop hypothyroidism, you can also become deficient in zinc, since your thyroid hormones help absorb the mineral, explains Iliac.

8. Brown rice:

Brown rice found that there is a significant link between how much selenium is in your diet and how healthy your thyroid is; selenium, a naturally-found chemical element, helps balance out thyroid-hormone production. And brown rice happens to be chock full of it.

9. Shellfish:

Shellfish like lobster and shrimp are good sources of iodine, she says. In fact, just 3 ounces of shrimp (about 4 or 5 pieces) contains more than 20% of your recommended intake. Bonus: shellfish can also be a good source of zinc, too. Three ounces of Alaskan crab and lobster contain 6.5 and 3.4 milligrams of zinc, respectively.

10. Fish:

One 3-ounce serving of baked cod contains about 99 micrograms of iodine or 66% of your daily recommended intake. Canned tuna is another good option: a 3-ounce serving runs about 17 micrograms or 11% of your daily iodine quota.

11. Milk:

Much of the iodine in the average American diet comes from dairy products, according to a 2008 study by researchers from the Food and Drug Administration. But our consumption of dairy has been on the decline for decades.

12. Egg:

One large egg contains about 16% of the iodine and 20% of the selenium you need for the day, making them a thyroid superfood. If you haven’t been instructed otherwise by your doctor, eat the whole egg (try our foolproof trick for cooking eggs over easy)—much of that iodine and selenium is located in the yolk, says Ilic.

13. Banana:

While bananas may seem like a common fruit, they actually contain powerful properties to help you heal from your thyroid disease, conditions, and symptoms. Bananas help restore neurotransmitters and support healing from neurological problems, which are among the symptoms related to thyroid problems.

14. Selenium:

Tiny amounts of selenium are needed for the enzymes that make thyroid hormones to work properly. Eating selenium-rich foods, such as sunflower seeds or Brazil nuts, can be beneficial. You can find high levels of selenium in wheat germ, seafood, shellfish, eggs, mushrooms, garlic, onion, sesame and sunflower seeds.

15. Fruits and vegetables:

Include either fresh fruits or veggies at each meal, if possible. Specific foods such as blueberries, cherries, sweet potatoes and green peppers are also rich in antioxidants, nutrients that are known to lower risk for heart disease.

Thiamine has many of the same benefits for thyroid health as vitamin B12, including supporting the metabolism and some of the top thiamine foods are: Green peas. Asparagus. Brussels sprouts, Sesame seeds and Sunflower seeds.
Some healthcare professionals recommend that you cut out all fried foods and reduce your intake of fats from sources such as butter, mayonnaise, margarine and fatty cuts of meat.

Hope this Symptoms and cure article will be helpful to all. Do not forget to share your valuable suggestions if any.

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