Benefits of Blood donating

An Overview

There’s no end to the benefits of donating blood for those who need it. According to theAmerican Red Cross, one donation can save as many as three lives, and someone in the United States needs blood every two seconds. This might be something you already knew about. You’ve probably seen the posters and the big mobile blood banks community blood drives are often in the public eye. We often hear about the importance of donating blood as it relates to the recipients. One blood donation could help up to three patients. But what are the benefits of donating blood for the donor? We don’t often hear about that side of the arrangement. While the impact is a little less obvious, there are several health advantages that come as a result of giving blood. It turns out, this compassionate choice can have healthy lifestyle benefits for the donor as well.

Top Benefits of Blood donation

1. Giving blood can reveal potential health problems

While it isn’t the same thing as a trip to the doctor, donating blood can be another way to keep an eye on your cardiovascular health. You’ll receive a mini-physical prior to the blood draw, in which someone will check your pulse, blood pressure, body temperature, hemoglobin and more. This can sometimes shed light on issues you didn’t even know about.

2. Giving blood can reduce harmful iron stores

One in every two hundred people in the U.S. is affected by a condition called hemochromatosis and most don’t even know it, according to Patenaude. Hemochromatosis is a disease that causes an iron overload and is labeled as the most common genetic disease among Caucasians by the Mayo Clinic.

3. Giving blood may lower your risk of suffering a heart attack

You mightbe surprised to discover that there may be heart health benefits to giving blood. Studies have shown that benefits of Blood Donation can reduce the risk of heart attacks to 1/3 times, especially in men. Blood, especially red blood cells are the cells that contain hemoglobin which is formed of iron, which serves to bind oxygen. The iron requirement depends on gender and age. Male adults need 8.5 mg / day and adult women of childbearing age requires 18.9 mg / day. Iron requirements can be obtained from foods derived from biological sources (non-heme iron) with the bioavailability of 2-3% and animal sources (heme iron) with a bioavailability of 20-23%.
The fact that the non-heme iron that difficult to be absorbed in fact actually beneficial because iron is too easily absorbed when consumed in excess, such as heme iron that comes from meat, it will accumulate in the body and can

4. Increase the risk of coronary heart disease

Blood donation has also been shown to lower the risk of cancer. Consistent blood donation is associated with lowered risks for cancers including liver, lung, colon, stomach and throat cancers.

5. Giving blood can help your liver stay healthy

Another danger of iron overload is the health of your liver. “In recent years, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the hepatic expression of metabolic syndrome, has reached epidemic proportions,” reports the National Center for Biotechnology Information.
Blood donors get to relax for an hour or so and lay back in a chair. It has to be one of the easiest ways to give something back to your community and potentially help other people. Speaking of which, it feels great to donate blood knowing that with one blood donation you could help three people and could even be helping yourself if you are ever in need of blood.

6. Stimulate Corpuscle

After donating blood, the body works to replenish blood loss. Benefits of blood donors regularly can help stimulate the production of new blood cells. Donating blood helping the body stay healthy and work more efficiently.
Side effect of donating blood regularly to our vital organs
Generally no side effects on the heart and other vital organs. it’s just may occur a decrease in heart rate and blood pressure drop sometimes. Actual Decrease in heart rate and blood pressure are normal reactions to the donating blood. The benefits of donating blood regularly to prevent and reduce the risk of chronic diseases

7. Reducing the Risk of Hemochromatosis

Haemochromatosis is a genetic disorder in which the body absorbs too much iron from food that our bodies undergo the course of causing excess iron.
Excess iron is then deposited in various organs, especially the liver. Excess iron can also be stored in the pancreas, liver, testis / ovary, skin and joints. The main action in overcoming Haemochromatosis is the removal of blood routine, it is done to reduce the excess iron from the body.

Research has linked too much iron with NAFLD, Hepatitis C and other liver diseases and infections. Though there are many other factors involved in these problems, donating blood can help relieve some of those iron stores and avoid extra issues in your liver.

Along with a health check-up, the donor will get a free blood analysis and be notified of their blood type. If a patient were to go to a doctor’s office to find out their blood type or get a blood analysis it would not be free, however, as a blood donor it’s completely free to the patient. Blood that is donated is checked for several health factors to make sure it can be used for donation. Some of the factors that are checked include HIV, syphilis and hepatitis. If blood contains a health factor that would not allow it to be donated, it is discarded and the patient is notified of the issue.

Donating blood has benefits for your emotional and physical health. According to a report by the Mental Health Foundation, helping others can:
• reduce stress
• improve your emotional well-being
• benefit your physical health
• help get rid of negative feelings
• provide a sense of belonging and reduce isolation
Research has found further evidence of the health benefits that come specifically from donating blood.

Side effects of donating blood

Blood donation is safe for healthy adults. There’s no risk of contracting disease. New, sterile equipment is used for each donor.
Some people may feel nauseous, lightheaded, or dizzy after donating blood. If this happens, it should only last a few minutes. You can lie down with your feet up at the until you feel better.
You may also experience some bleeding at the site of the needle. Applying pressure and raising your arm for a couple of minutes will usually stop this. You may develop a bruise at the site.
Call the blood donation center if:
• You still feel lightheaded, dizzy, or nauseous after drinking, eating, and resting.
• You develop a raised bump or continue bleeding at the needle site.
• You have arm pain, numbness, or tingling.

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