Allergy shots

Description

Allergy shots help your body get used to allergens, the things that trigger an allergic reaction. They aren’t a cure, but in time, your symptoms will get better and you may not have symptoms as often. You may want to consider allergy shots also called ” immunotherapy” if you have symptoms more than 3 months a year and medicines don’t give you enough relief. Each allergy shot contains a tiny amount of the specific substance or substances that trigger your allergic reactions. These are called allergens. Allergy shots contain just enough allergens to stimulate your immune system — but not enough to cause a full-blown allergic reaction.

Over time, your doctor increases the dose of allergens in each of your allergy shots. This helps get your body used to the allergens (desensitization). Your immune system builds up a tolerance to the allergens, causing your allergy symptoms to diminish over time.
Insect allergies, Seasonal allergies to things like ragweed, and indoor allergies can all be treated with allergy shots. Food allergies cannot. Before offering allergy shots to a patient, a doctor will usually conduct an interview to collect information about the patient’s history and current medications, to make sure that he or she is a good candidate for the shots.

How Often Do You Get Allergy Shots?

At first, you’ll go to your doctor once or twice a week for several months. You’ll get the shot in your upper arm. It’ll contain a tiny amount of the thing you’re allergic to pollen, pet dander, mold, dust mites or bee venom for example. Allergy shots work by decreasing symptoms from particular allergens.
Each injection contains small amounts of the allergen so that your body builds up immunity to it over time. The process works much like taking a vaccine, where your body creates new antibodies to combat the invasive substances. Allergy shots also improve the way other immune system cells and substances function in response to allergens.

Side Effects of Allergy Shots

  • Below are mentioned other side effects, take a look. You may have experienced one or more.
  • Low fever
  • Nausea
  • Chest and throat tightness
  • Cold and cough
  • Itching and skin rashes
  • Bloated feeling
  • Sudden, unexplained weight gain
  • Tingling feeling in muscles
  • Swelling and soreness in joints
  • Developing other allergies
  • Immediate and extreme fatigue within the next few hours (may last for more than 24 hours)
  • Throbbing pain in body parts such as neck, back, arms, hands, legs and joints especially after taking these shots.

In some people, it is observed that while you may not show common allergy symptoms near the source of allergen, the joint and muscle pain will worsen. Anaphylaxis may occur in extreme cases. The side effects can be worse in asthma patients.

How do you give an allergy shot?

1. Call for emergency medical help immediately.
2. Know where your allergy shot is at all times.
3. Remove the source of the allergy if possible.
4. Open the package and take the safety cap off of your injector.
5. About 4 inches above your skin.

How do allergy shots work?

Allergy shots work by decreasing symptoms from particular allergens.
Each injection contains small amounts of the allergen so that your body builds up immunity to it over time. The process works much like taking a vaccine, where your body creates new antibodies to combat the invasive substances. Allergy shots also improve the way other immune system cells and substances function in response to allergens. Eventually, successful hypnotherapy helps the body fight off allergens and reduce adverse symptoms.

Types

Allergy shots have traditionally been the most common form of immunotherapy and are known as subcutaneous immunotherapy or SCIT.
This treatment is when an allergen is injected under the skin.
There is now a newer form of immunotherapy called sublingual immunotherapy or SLIT. With this, instead of the allergen being injected under the skin, it is administered, as a tablet or a drop, under the tongue.

Allergy shots can be used to control symptoms triggered by:

• Seasonal allergies. If you have seasonal allergic asthma or hay fever symptoms, you may be allergic to pollens released by trees, grasses or weeds.

• Indoor allergens. If you have year-round symptoms, you may be sensitive to indoor allergens, such as dust mites, cockroaches, mold or dander from pets such as cats or dogs.

• Insect stings. Allergic reactions to insect stings can be triggered by bees, wasps, hornets or yellow jackets.

Hope this Symptoms and cure article will be helpful to all. Do not forget to share your valuable suggestions if any.

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